Rapiditas Studio by Layla & David

Bootlegging is a lot like marmite; you either love it or hate it, you either get it or you don’t! Layla and David of Rapiditas studio GET IT and do it oh so well. Imperfection, irony and ‘bad taste’ being at the heart, in my opinion, of what they do. As they say below, they appropriate and distort what we all know- the ‘perfect’, capitalist giants- and make them ‘imperfect’ and their own.

This approach to bootleg, in my opinion, is how it should be done- Dapper Dan, for example, being the father of Bootleg. His designs were beautifully made, with fine workmanship BUT he made the logos of large fashion houses his own, he didn’t attempt to perfectly emulate their designs but made his own BETTER ones. This can be seen today with studios such as Rapiditas, they see these logos and want to create something of their own with them, in the best way they know how and it’s not about perfection for them.

The best bootlegging is the unexpected, the designs that wouldn’t be created by the companies that are being featured. It’s not about emulation but instead something new alongside the familiar and imposing imagery.

I find their work so so satisfying and cannot wait to be able to add some of it to my home. See what they had to say below-

  1. Tell us about yourself and your brand. 

Rapiditas  are two people. Layla and David.

Layla is a freelance graphic designer and web master. David is a DJ and promoter, co-founder of Caballito Netlabel.

We both like image, design, music and the arts.

Of course we love food and being at home.

Rapiditas is a brand that David invented many years ago to create t-shirts, tote bags and some designs. It never came to anything, until now.

Now it is practically focused on ceramics. 

What we do is simple. We create ceramic objects in a rough and imperfect way because we don’t know how to do it better. And then we stamp in ceramic decals or hand painted, everything we can think of, we appropriate all the logos that invade the lives of almost everyone and we deform them.

On our website you can find a very pompous definition, of course it is copied and distorted.

2. What are your Inspirations? 

We listen to random people’s music on Soundcloud and Bandcamp.

3. Lets chat about social media- a hindrance or help? 

 Both require a lot of time and know how they work and are also a quick window for them to get to know you. If it weren’t for IG we wouldn’t be here and we would never have sold a mug. 🙂

4.  Where would you like your business to be in a few years and do you have any advice? 

We would like to keep creating new things, mix materials, keep having fun.

If you do what you enjoy doing, you are doing the right thing. easy.

5. Who are your favourite small businesses or creatives doing interesting things? 

These are a few people who do fun and interesting things and they sure love what they do.      The list could be longer:

instagram.com/prettychocoboworld/

instagram.com/irenecienfu/

instagram.com/acabceramics/

instagram.com/rebequitalabonita/

instagram.com/alicia.hena/

instagram.com/bizumfabiosteopatiktok/

instagram.com/xavierdekepper/

instagram.com/33_degres_sous_les_cocotiers/

instagram.com/93nido/

Clay Kitchen by Lyndsay Sawyer

As we’ve discussed previously, this strange time has enabled people to crack out the crafts and explore creative outlets they might not have had time to focus on before the pandemic. Clay Kitchen by the lovely Lyndsay is the result of this extra time and love for tiny smiley faces on everyday food (& earbuds!).

Any mixture of tiny models, food and smiley faces is always going to result in something I’ll enjoy… and I hope you all do as well! A perfect gift that will look qt as fuq on any kitchen shelf alongside your favourite cook books, an essential for any home tbh.

Read on to find out more about Lyndsay and Clay Kitchen…

1.Tell us about yourself and your brand. 

I’m Lyndsay and I live in Bristol, I started playing round with air dry clay in the first lockdown last year, because I needed to occupy my brain/time. I’ve always been obsessed with eggs (I even have an egg tattoo) So what started out as making smiley fried eggs turned into all different kinds of food sculptures and  My friends and partner encouraged me to start an Instagram account, commissions (some non-food related!) followed and I very recently launched a shop!

Clay Kitchen is all about fun and silliness with a nostalgic nod to the contents of my school lunchbox. I just want to make things that make people smile.

  1. What are your Inspirations? 

The city of Bristol, it’s a very inspiring and creative place. I feel like there is a community that always champions the independent. It also has a great food and craft beer scene which is a constant source of inspiration. I’ve always been a creative person and I studied Art & Design at university. I regularly visit galleries and sculpture parks (when not in a pandemic!)

  1. Lets chat about social media- a hindrance or help? 

I don’t think I would of had the courage to launch a shop without the response I was getting on social media. I’ve met so many great makers and small businesses since launching Clay Kitchen but also it’s so hard not to get consumed with worry about posting the right or enough content. With social media you are constantly comparing yourself to other people and I have been reminding myself that I need to go at my own pace and to enjoy what I’m doing.

  1.  Where would you like your business to be in a few years and do you have any advice?  

I’m very much at the beginning right now and I’m just so happy when people say they love my work. Getting enough work to go part time in my not very exciting day job would be the absolute dream! As for advice..I’m just muddling along trying to figure everything out but I would say there are so many lovely creative people out there. I’ve had some amazing conversations with people whose work I really admire, so don’t be afraid to send someone a message!

5. Who are your favourite small businesses or creatives doing interesting things? 

Ahhhhh there are so many many talented people out there! Catalina Cheng (@catalina_cheng) is an amazing artist. Hiller Goodspeed’s (@hillergoodspeed) work is just a constant joy and inspiration. Bernie Kaminski (@berniekaminski) and Madison Rudin (@madisonrudin_art) make wonderful things! There are so many great independent Bristol based businesses but some of my favourites are The DIY Supermarket (@theDIYsupermarket) Pirrip Press (@pirrip_press) & Good Store Studio (@goodstorestudio)

Rosie Anwara

There is talent…and then there is talent…ya’know? Well Rosie has THAT kind of talent. Whether it’s sewing or painting, this lady transforms simple felt or a pair of Vans into pop culture/brightly coloured/textured/cute as fuck handmade and decorated goods!

Painstaking in her detailed depictions and subtle nods to cult movies, Drag Race or even RHOBH, Rosies choice of themes is 100% up my street and It should be up yours. Hey!? even if you don’t get the obscure references and quotes you can absolutely appreciate the amazing work that goes into each decoration or painted leather jacket. With collaborations between big businesses such as Vans and Size?, it’s refreshing to see such a detail orientated one woman show being recognised and appreciated.

I for one can’t wait to see what she has up her reference sleeve next. So, please read on to find out about Rosie and her process…

  1. Tell us about yourself and your brand. 

Hi, I’m Rosie! I’m from Newcastle but have been living in London for the last 8 years. I studied Fashion at uni and put a lot of my focus into embroidery and illustration. When I left and started working full time, I missed having that creative outlet so I was always giving myself projects to work on. 

In 2016 I got my first proper Christmas tree and spent weeks collecting decorations and I was super proud of it, but in February 2017, I had a huge fire in my flat and lost all of them. The following Christmas I was pretty skint from trying to rebuild my life after the fire and had some leftover felt from a work project…so I decided to make myself some decorations! After two years of doing my thing and posting on Instagram, people started asking me if they could buy them and saying they looked forward to seeing them every Christmas and so, Rosie Anwara was born! 

Rosie Anwara is essentially an explosion of the creative side of my brain. I’m not sure how to condense what I do into one zippy sentence, but my main goal is to make beautiful, silly stuff that brings people happiness!

2. What are your Inspirations?

Cliché but I really do get my inspiration from everywhere and everything. Pop culture, travel, food, T.V. and film, cultural moments, friends, celebrities, politics… you name it and I could probably come up with a decoration based on it. Sometimes it could even be that I have fabric or beads I really want to use, so I work backwards and use those as the inspiration.

My paintings are typically commissions, I try to make them as thoughtful and personal as possible. I always want to find a connection between what I’m painting and the person who will wear/own it so that it’s extra special. 

3. Lets chat about social media- a hindrance or help? 

It’s completely invaluable for me! I’m still just starting out but without Instagram, I wouldn’t have even made a sale as I don’t sell on any other platform. I also wouldn’t have had any of the opportunities I’ve had to work with brands like Vans and Size? and I wouldn’t have met so many amazing people who inspire, support and encourage me to keep doing my thang!

Aside from making sales, Instagram is also vital in helping me build my brand and create something that’s ownable and recognisable. 

4. Where would you like your business to be in a few years and do you have any advice? 

I used to do a lot of 5 year plans but I realised I was setting myself up for disappointment and anxiety because I never seemed to reach my lofty goals! So I’ve gone back to taking it day to day. I sometimes wish I had an end goal to work towards but life is unpredictable, Not a single set back or opportunity that has come my way was ever in my ‘plan’. I find it less taxing on my mental health to just roll with it. 

And on that note, if I had any advice to give, I’d defer to Little Miss Sunshine…”Do what you love, and fuck the rest”.

5. Who are your favourite small businesses or creatives doing interesting things? 

First and foremost I have to shout out to my boyfriend Ant Gardner, a graphic designer who has launched his own line of art prints that I just love – @wallgarments. He’s a constant source of inspiration and knowledge for me as well as the creator of all my graphics and branding! I’m very lucky to have him. 

@PaolaCiar paints the most incredible, voyeuristic scenes at a teeny, tiny scale. I love her depictions of unapologetically confident women who love their bodies – we can never have enough of that attitude in the world. I admire Paola so much, her sense of humour and imagination is like no other! 

I don’t have bébé’s myself but I’m obsessed with @PetiteGanache and their beautiful, handmade kids trousers. Maybe when I’m a shrunken old lady I could squeeze into a pair. 

I only came across @CraftyGlass over the Christmas period and I absolutely love what she does, it’s such a unique take on a traditional craft and it’s a little bit silly, like me 🙂

@CastroSmith has talent coming out of his ears. I can think of no other way to describe his jewellery than mind-blowing. Every piece is a true work of art and I dream of owning some one day! 

Lolo NYC by Lauren Williams

As this blog shows there are a plethora of awesome makers, designers and creators producing the most amazing products, and Lauren Williams of Lolo NYC is at the forefront of curating a space to celebrate them. Across the Atlantic ocean, Lauren is working away to showcase these collections of thoughtfully designed pieces by creating a tactile and immersive space for customers to enjoy. From ceramics, glassware and stationery to soap and rugs; Lolo NYC has it all!

Retail as an experience is so important, having worked in it myself for many years, nothing beats a well considered boutique and the act of actually touching and feeling products. Independent shops, such as, Lolo are under a severe amount of constant pressure to stay afloat and any support is essential, especially after the year we’ve had! If I find myself in NYC anytime soon (I 100% wish) I know where i’d be heading… straight to Lolo to get one of the face glasses by Tak Tak… I die.

See what the lovely Lauren has to say below…

1.Tell us about yourself and your brand/work. 

My name is Lauren Williams Russett and I’m the founder of Lolo! I studied Apparel Design at RISD and worked as a women’s fashion designer in NYC for 8 years before founding Lolo. At least 2 of those years were spent planning Lolo secretly in my overworked noggin. Lolo is a Brooklyn based retail store (and soon-to-be coffeeshop!) replete with items for your home and your body. We focus on hand-made and thoughtfully designed pieces by emerging artists and designers. Nearly all of our inventory is by female identifying makers and/or majority women-owned businesses, but we welcome all folks and all genders to the roster and in the space. We are committed to continuously expanding the diversity of these makers. 

2.What are your Inspirations?  

I am constantly inspired by interiors, new and old, for color schemes, shapes, patterns, textures, etc. A part of me has always regretted studying fashion instead of interiors, but I do think that both worlds flow together.
In regards to general ideas, whether creative or business-wise, I always come up with something during a long run while my mind travels. Sometimes I run in silence, sometimes with a podcast. Both ways always produce some sort of idea that gets dropped into my notes app on my phone. Probably 70% of these ideas are complete shit, but yay to the other 30% and to exercise!

3.Lets chat about social media- a hindrance or help?

Oh man, I hate to say that my brand relies so much on an app owned by Facebook, but it really does right now! Instagram has been a huge help during Covid while my IRL shop is closed. I used to rely mostly on my in-store sales and I used to gain new customers by word of mouth in the neighborhood or through good ol’ strolling-down-the-block-discovery. But now that I temporarily have no IRL presence, I’ve really come to rely on connecting with people through social media. Instead of talking to customers face to face, I’ve been doing it through DM’s and emails. And in return, I have so many new international and out of state customers (and friends!). Instagram is also just a generally fabulous tool to discover new brands and like-minded artists. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t have a “potential vendors” folder in my instagram of tagged images I connect with 😉 What’s so great about having a multi brand shop is that I can essentially make a physical space out of saved images and surround myself and others with the work of brilliant, creative minds.

4.Where would you like your business to be in a few years and do you have any advice? 

I’d love for my business to no longer be bootstrapped! Bootstrapped means everything the business makes right now is basically totally reinvested into the business. I’ve barely had the chance to take a salary for myself yet and am relying on savings. I plan on opening a new retail shop/coffee shop combo this Spring… a year behind schedule for various 2020 reasons. My goal is that the double source of revenue gets Lolo’s boots unstrapped, ha! Doing so would mean I could take more risks, pay people more, and buy more things for the shop!
My advice to other entrepreneurs, especially after these past several months, would be not to rush anything and to let cues from the universe pace you a bit. Covid slowed me down, but definitely for the better. Lolo had a weird sort of luck this year in the sense that my lease on my previous retail shop ended March 1st 2020… about 2 weeks before NYC went into lockdown. This released me from the rent of an unusable space. My agreement with the landlords at my new, future space is that I do not need to pay rent until construction is completed. If I had unnaturally rushed things, I may not be in this very lucky situation.

5.Who are your favourite small businesses or creatives doing interesting things?

Recently, I’ve been totally obsessed with everything I see Emma Kohlmann making. Those burnt wood frames around her paintings?! I gasped. Her show at Jack Hanley Gallery was stunning and created a little world full of detail that I would love to live in.

Julia Elsas

There are those times when you see something on the internet and instantly fall head over heels in love, well…that happened with me and Julia’s awesome ceramic work. With bold colours and imperfect but perfectly formed designs Julia’s ceramic collections are aesthetic forces to be reckoned with.

As Julia mentions below she reacted to a hole in the market for functional artful products and she was so so right. You know what is hard to find? GOOD WALL HOOKS!!! These wonderful handmade hooks fill that void that is usually just filled with horrible minimalist metal or weird pine wall hooks perfectly.

Merging her artistic crafts perfectly, whether it’s her installation art or ceramic lines; each are a clear extension of herself, her passions and inspirations. As Julia discusses below, she wants these crafts (and the crafting/ small business world) to create a sustainable and community driven world, imagining a more localised economy where independent creators and businesses are supported (which is something, fingers crossed, I have seen coming into fruition over the past few months.)

Please read on, Julia has given one of my favourite and most insightful bunch of answers to the five questions!

  1. Tell us about yourself and your brand. 

Hello! My name is Julia Elsas. I am a visual artist and currently live in Brooklyn, NY. I work with ceramics, printmaking, installation and performance. My first NY solo show is open now until November 28th at Cooler Gallery in Brooklyn. I also have a line of ceramic goods which include wall hooks, menorahs, necklaces and vases. The ceramic products I make either started as small sculptural elements in larger installations, or they were created as functional artful objects that I couldn’t find elsewhere. The first pieces I officially released into the world as ceramic ‘products’ outside of my visual art were ceramic necklaces. Over time I began making and selling ceramic wall hooksmenorahs, and tube vases. I initially marketed my ceramic product line under a different name, but last year I switched back to releasing everything under my name. I hope my art can lead people to the smaller objects for sale and visa versa. 

  1. What are your Inspirations?

My list of inspirations is endless. I grew up in Birmingham, Alabama and spent summers driving around the southeastern part of the United States visiting “folk artists” like Howard FinsterMose Toliver and places like Ave Maria Grotto.  My mom gave me a copy of Amiri Baraka’s “Hunting is not the Heads on the Wall” (published in 1964 when he went by Le Roi Jones) when I was in high school, and it profoundly affected my ideas about art and life and how, for many/most non-western cultures, the two are completely intertwined and inseparable. Other inspirations: Nina Simone; Hilma af Klint; Gees Bend quilts; Shaker Gift Drawings; Mexican textiles by Josefa Ibarra; Sophie Calle; The Discipline of Do Easy, by William S. Burroughs and Gus van Sant; and it continues…

3.Lets chat about social media- a hindrance or help? 

Social media is a terrible and dangerous platform if you are looking for sincere human interaction and connection. It has contributed to a vast amount of misinformation and divisiveness in our country and around the world. On the other hand (!), Instagram has been 100% helpful for marketing my work, getting new stocklists, discovering new artists, etc.

 4.Where would you like your business to be in a few years and do you have any advice? 

I am working on some large orders (very large for me!) this holiday season for new stocklists. I feel fortunate to have the work, especially at a time when so many people are out of jobs, but long term bigger isn’t necessarily better for me. I’m happy to keep my business small and make my products mostly in-house. It’s important for me to keep the quality of craftsmanship high and stay true to myself as an artist. In the next few years I would love to work on limited edition projects with other artists, designers and artful brands. As my business grows, it’s important for me to figure out how to create sustainable long-term ways to give back to my community. I love what artists are doing in the Level Up Project

Some of the best advice I have gotten is to take the leap and get your work out there! Your website and line sheet don’t have to be perfect. You can always tweak designs, prices, and products as you go. You have to spend money to make money – especially if you are investing in making ceramic products to sell! Take a risk and invest in yourself and don’t be afraid to ask for help and advice along the way.

5. Who are your favourite small businesses or creatives doing interesting things? 

There are so many, but first and foremost,

Love and Victory  is run by my friend Meg Morehouse. Meg designs barware and a range of cocktail-related goods, but she is also a fierce activist and a constant inspiration. 

Sheena Sood was a student of mine at the Lower East Side Print Shop, and I love watching her clothing brand, Abacaxi grow! I don’t have any of her pieces yet, but I’m eyeing a few items from her latest collection.

I am so impressed by Sarah Hussaini / Not Work Related  and how she grabbed the pandemic by the horns and moved a wheel into the bathroom of her Brooklyn apartment to continue throwing pots when everything was shut down. I was lucky enough to snag one of her ceramic mugs made during that time. They sell out in a few minutes!

I subscribed to Michelle Ishikawa’s Okimoto  flower share this summer, and it brought me beauty and wonderment during a strange and stressful time. Michelle says it better than I can on her website: “She strives to give back to the earth as much as we collectively borrow from it, and is dedicated to furthering discourse on how to mindfully steward our environment and radically dream of a more equitable and just economic future.” 

I’m obsessed with Anders Hamilton’s Crater Cups recently released through BKLYN Clay. I want them all.

Lotta Blobs by Shantelle Hyslop

As probably the newest brand and creator I’ve had the pleasure of speaking to, Shantelle has it nailed already!

Lotta Blobs is a simple concept but clearly super effective, with 17.8k followers on Instagram in a few months. Shantelle has tapped into the airy, fun and girly interior trend as well as the selfie sharing culture that dominates the social media app: clearly a powerful combination. Pastel, cute and slightly abstract, these mirrors tick all the boxes.

It’s been so awesome discovering so many creators that have obviously seen a lack of something in the interior/design/fashion market and have successfully filled it with their own creations. The past two creators have dealt mainly with mirrors…. and they are totally right to- affordable design led, unusual mirrors are hard to come by and are evidently in demand. Unfortunately this will most probably result in the big retailers lazily copying them and churning them out for the masses by next year (WE SEE YOU!!), but as always, these creative makers will be producing considered and well made products nonetheless. As always, shop small and support independent business and makers- they are always the first to do it and should be recognised for their creative visions/ buying habits/ risks.

Check out what Shantelle had to say about her wonderful creations…

  1. Tell us about yourself and your brand/work. 

I’m Shantelle, creator of Lotta Blobs. I’m a Graphic Designer by day and blob sculptor by night! Lotta Blobs is a London based brand where I create bright coloured sculpted mirrors. My aim is to add a touch of colour and fun to everyone’s reflection! 

  1. What are your Inspirations? 

I’m an avid homeware collector so I’ve always wanted to create something that I’d love to stumble upon and add to my collection at home. I’m always on the hunt for something that is colourful and seems one of a kind so I try and replicate that in my designs.

  1. Lets chat about social media- a hindrance or help?

Mostly helping! I started the business on Instagram so I have it to thank for the success so far. Though I am slowly getting overwhelmed by my DM’s filling up daily!

  1. Where would you like your business to be in a few years and do you have any advice?

I honestly have no idea! Lotta Blobs is just over a month old so I’m just riding the wave for now! I would like to collaborate with other creatives and develop my collection.

  1.  Who are your favourite small businesses or creatives doing interesting things? 

I love: @squaresandthings // @emilystollery // @lucycarterart // @low_____tide // @sophiecolle // @bougiewoogie___ // @nataconceptstore

Ugly Rugly by Lauren and Cole

As you read through Lauren and Coles’ inspirations in the below blog post, you instantly, or I do anyway, want to be their friend. From Anni Albers to recent theories on the big bang, these inspirations aren’t on all your usual go-to mood boards and that makes me happy and comforted- like a big warm aesthetically pleasing and historically engaging hug.

Ugly Rugly (named after the first rug Lauren made) is a melting pot of handmade goods, in all my favourite colours. From coasters that look like the word ‘splat!’; massive, beautifully made graphic rugs; to awesome interchangeable bags. It’s all fun but with good design practices and sturdy materials throughout their collections. With that in mind, I love to see what is happening currently in New York with so many creative small business emerging and gaining recognition, moving beyond Instagram and looking at expansion: Ugly Rugly is very much a part of this movement. With their sights set on expanding their product archive and opening a space to share their vision and broaden their community.

The funny thing about Instagram is that its this humongous global app with millions of people on it. However, so far, many of the businesses I chat to that begin there are so centred on community, focussing on locality as well as honing and nurturing their craft. It’s refreshing…and that is what Ugly Rugly (and so many of these businesses are) is, refreshing. Good quality products, considered and well made with a wonderful ethos behind it.

Here is what Lauren and Cole had to say…

  1. Tell us about yourself and your brand.

Hi there! I’m Lauren and I am the co-founder of Ugly Rugly. My husband, Cole, and I began Ugly Rugly in 2018 as a side project making funky rugs and other textile-y homegoods. The name Ugly Rugly comes from the first rug I made, it was a very wonky uneven rag rug (that still lives in my kitchen!) and I called it my little Ugly Rugly it is imperfect but it brings so much joy to me that I just wanted to keep making more rugs!

My background is in Fashion Design and Retail. I started Ugly Rugly as a side project while I was working at a corporate job. I wasn’t miserable there but I just felt like I wanted to do more. So I started playing around with making rag rugs and rope rugs, from there Cole came on board and we taught ourselves how to use a tufting gun and began creating bright and unusual rugs and home goods. We love to push our mediums, using rope in new ways, playing with unconventional silhouettes and abstract motifs. Our whole purpose with Ugly Rugly is to have fun with it and make objects for your home that make you laugh and lighten up a space. We do most of our production in-house and that’s one of the best parts for me. I love to sew and make things, but I especially love production and manufacturing. The covid crisis has really messed up our production schedule and made timing things very difficult but we just moved into a little studio in Brooklyn NY and are working on releasing some new rugs and other items in (hopefully!) November that we’re really excited about.

  1. What are your Inspirations?

Cole and I are both inspired by early 20th century art movements like abstract expressionism, for example Helen Frankenthaller and Hans Hoffman. We also are inspired by the Suprematist movement Lissitzky and Malevich – both in the spirit of revolution and the work that accompanies it. Along with the Bauhaus movement and modern design movement, Josef and Anni Albers and Charles and Ray Eames. I believe that the core of our design philosophy is heavily influenced by those movements.

Beyond that, I often draw inspiration from Science Fiction. I’m endlessly fascinated by our natural world and space as an extension of it. Lately I’ve read nearly all of Octavia Butler’s books, Hyperion from Dan Simmons, and Adrian Tchaikovsky. The recent news of a new map being designed similar to the Voyager Golden Record using pulsar stars as guideposts for the galaxy and Penrose’s new theory about the big bang are just a few of many fascinating and inspiring space developments.
I’m always checking out books from the library (pre-covid!) and learning new techniques or researching historical textiles/fibers/etc. I love researching the American arts and craft and textile manufacturing processes of earlier eras. Cole and I both grew up on farms in Central California and are the descendants of Dust Bowl migrants (think Grapes of Wrath) and I’m  inspired by the do-it-yourself and inherently sustainable nature of the textiles from that era. Nothing went to waste and people problem solved as they went along, I like to think both Cole and I both draw on that spirit when designing and making.

  1. Lets chat about social media- a hindrance or help?

Social Media is a huge help. Marketing is the part of this business that I’m newest to and having a tool like instagram has been a huge help in getting the word out about Ugly Rugly! I think it works best if we don’t take it too seriously and just use it as a tool for sharing. I try not to get too wrapped up in engagement or how many likes we get. I’m happiest when we keep things authentic and sometimes that means ignoring the algorithm!

  1.  Where would you like your business to be in a few years and do you have any advice?

In the near future we want to begin expanding into new products categories and trying out some different mediums and methods of construction for rugs, and ultimately to move into using more recycled materials if possible. I used to teach sewing and that’s something I would like to continue doing in the future. Ultimately, we would like Ugly Rugly to expand into a workshop storefront. I would love to have a space where we can showcase our work and our friend’s work, teach classes, take on production jobs, and have a design studio. I envision it as an equitable space where people openly share skills and talk about ways to bring their ideas to life.

5. Who are your favourite small businesses or creatives doing interesting things?

There are so many friends doing amazing projects! You’ve already interviewed our bud Marissa of Off Beat Sweet but some other faves are:

@myfawnwy  – does amazing stuff with marbling
@bodylanguageshop – plant hangers
@Chunksshop – makes the coolest hair clips
@travissswinford – making clocks and blobby tables@rosegreenberg – wacky pillows
@shopberriez – best vintage